Monday, October 20, 2014

Samantha at Mystic Seaport

First off, a new 1870s dress for visiting a 19th century fishing village in Mystic Seaport, CT.  This is a three piece bustle dress made from the Thimbles and Acorns pattern, made from pink gingham and broadcloth, and trimmed with ruffled lace, a rosebud lace, and ribbon rosettes.




The Charles W Morgan, the last wooden whaling ship in the world
Giant Squash
Another wooden tall ship
And a ship in a bottle as a souvenir

Monday, October 13, 2014

Kirsten's fancy dress



Kirsten has a new fancy dress (though it's really more spring colors than fall).  The fabric is a piece of cotton sateen I picked up in Beijing this past spring.  I used the Kirsten's apron dress pattern from the old Pleasant company patterns.  There's lace trim around the skirt and matching trim around the waistband.  I used a different lace for the bodice overlay and trimmed it with a tiny applique rosette.  There's also tiny venice lace on the sleeve cuffs.

Free American Girl Pattern: Remake of Samantha's BeForever meet dress

Samantha was my first doll, purchased for my 21st birthday as my first action as a 'real adult', so I was rather sad when she retired in 2007.  But she's been rereleased this fall!

However, I can't say I'm a fan of her new meet dress.  It looks skimpy and just off compared to the Edwardian patterns I've seen.  So I made her a new one based on a pattern from 1905, so it's even mostly period.


The dress is made of pink dotted swiss with eyelet ruffle at the sleeves, neck, and hem.  I used a scrap of burgundy ribbon in my stash for the waist sash and matching hair bow.  The sash ties into a giant bow in the back.

The pattern is the housedress featured in Le Semaine de Suzette 1905 issue 1 for Bleuette.  I've resized the pattern to work for American Girl dolls.

Friday, August 22, 2014

Free Historical Book Pattern 'The Wonders of a Toy Shop' for 18" Dolls


The dolls have been complaining about a lack of attention to the minor accessories to which they hold dear.  So of course I had to go looking for something just the right size for them.

The book is a replica of a children's picture book from the 1850s (making this period for Kirsten, Cecile, and Marie-Grace).  The original can be found at http://www.read.gov/books/toy.html as part of the Library of Congress's rare book collection.

Instructions
Book Template

Nellie's pretty pleased with her new book.